About | Faculty | Calendar | Resources | Affiliates | Exhibitions


Major/Minor Requirements | College Course Atlas | Honors Program | Benefits of Religion Major | Internships, Fellowships and Awards

Department Course Offerings by Semester

(select semester on the right; the page will open in a new browser window)

All Department Courses Listed Below

Spring 2010

Fall 2009

Summer 2009

Spring 2009

Fall 2008

Summer 2008

Spring 2008

 

Courses Offered

Listed below are the courses offered by the Department of Religion. Please be aware that not all courses are offered every year and some infrequently. Additional courses may be offered on an experimental basis. The Emory College Course Atlas should be consulted for courses offered each semester. Courses that are approved to meet the General Education Requirement "Writing Requirement" (WRT) will only meet the requirement when in a given semester the specific section of a course is noted on OPUS as meeting that requirement. For more information on GERs, go to this College web page: http://college.emory.edu/home/academic/general_education/

Introductory Courses

100. Introduction to Religions
150. Introduction to Sacred Texts
170. Special Topics in Religion

190. Freshman Seminar
200. Religion and Contemporary Experience
205. Biblical Literature
209. History of Religions in America
210R. Classic Religious Texts(WRT)
211. Western Religious Traditions
212. Asian Religious Traditions
215. Greek and Roman Religion

270R. Special Topics in Religion
290R. Topics Abroad

Upper Level Courses by Tradition

African-American
320. African-American Religion (WRT)
326. Black Christian Thought (WRT)

American
209.
History of Religions in America
319. Native American Religions
336. Religious Pluralism in Atlanta

Asian
302. Religions in Colonial India

374. Confucian Classics (WRT)
388. The Cultural Revolution (same as CHN/EAS 388) (WRT)

Buddhist

305. Introduction to Buddhism
306. Tibetan Buddhism
307. East Asian Buddhism
310. Modern Buddhism
331. Culture of Buddhist Tibet
365. Buddhist Philosophy

Christian
311.
Early and Medieval Christianity
312. Protestant Christianity
313. Modern Catholicism (WRT)
348. The New Testament in its Context (WRT)
350. Jesus and the Gospels (WRT)
351. Paul and His Letters (WRT)

Hindu
301. Hindu Traditions (WRT)

302. Religions in Colonial India
303. Modern Hinduism

Islamic
315. The Qur'an (WRT)
316. Early and Medieval Islam
317. Modern Islam
318. Islamic Law (WRT)
381.
Islamic West 600-1600 (same as MES 381 & SPAN 381)
414. Shiite Islam (WRT)
415. Great Books of the Islamic World (WRT)

Judaic
272.
Modern Jewish Literature
308. Judaism
309. Jews and Judaism in Modern Times
324. The Holocaust
340. Rabbinic Judaism
341. Medieval Jewish Thought
343. Modern Jewish Thought
346. Jewish Legal Thinking

Middle Eastern
251.
Daily Life in Ancient Israel (WRT)
260. Introduction to Biblical Archaeology
261R.
Field work in Biblical Archaeology
327. Religion in Holy Land on Location
361. The Sufi Way

366. Afghanistan and Central Asia

Upper Level Courses

300. Interpreting Religion
321. Psychology of Religion
322. Religion and Sexuality (WRT)
323. Death and Dying
328. Women, Religion, and Ethnography (WRT)
329. Religion and Ecology
332. South African History and Issues
333. Religion and the Body
334. Dance & Embodied Knowledge
363. Philosophy of Religion [note: This course has been deleted. See PHIL 431: Philosophy of Religion in Philosophy Department.]
369. Religion and Film
387. Literature and Religion

Upper Level Repeatable Courses

352R. Gender and Religion
353R. Mystical Thought and Practice
354R. Ethics (WRT)
355R. Ritual and Worship
356R. Theological Reflection
357R. Religion and Conflict
358R. Religion and Healing
370R.
Special Topics: Religion and Culture
372R. Special Topics: Classical Texts and Religious Thought (WRT)
373R. Special Topics in Religious Studies
380R. Internship in Religion
390R. Topics Abroad
472R. Topics in Religion
495R. Directed Reading (Honors) (WRT in final semester)
497R. Directed Reading

Advanced Courses for Majors

470. Joint Seminar in Philosophy and Religion
490. Senior Symposium (WRT)


Introductory Courses

100. Introduction to Religions
An exploration of diverse ways of being religious (for example, in thought, action, community, and experience) as they are displayed in several traditions and cultures.

Return to Top

150. Introduction to Sacred Texts
(Same as MESAS 160) Comparative study of sacred texts in two or more religious traditions; textual authority, canons, primary and secondary texts, types of texts, and the function of sacred texts in religious communities.

Return to Top

170. Special Topics in Religion
Variety of subjects pertaining to religion at an introductory level. Content will vary in successive offerings. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

190. Freshman Seminar
Dynamics of inquiry on a focused research topic. Will include discussion, debate, oral and written presentations. Topic varies.

Return to Top

200. Religion and Contemporary Experience
Religion and contemporary issues of human existence, the role of religion in politics and international conflicts, or the nature of contemporary religious movements such as fundamentalism.

Return to Top

205. Biblical Literature
(Same as JS 205) The Hebrew scriptures (“Old Testament”), in translation, examined in their historical setting, and in their roles as sacred texts in Judaism and Christianity.

Return to Top

209. History of Religions in America
An examination of American religious history and culture from the Colonial period to the present.

Return to Top

210R. Classic Religious Texts
This course will explore classic religious texts in depth, developing skills to interpret sacred, philosophical and ethical works. Social, cultural, and/or philosophical contexts at work will provide interpretive framework.

Return to Top

211. Western Religious Traditions
This course examines western religions over a significant span of history, special emphasis on interactions between culture and religion and between religions; topic varies.

Return to Top

212. Asian Religious Traditions
Thematic study of at least two Asian religious traditions. Thematic emphasis may include relationships of text and context, pilgrimage, gender, epic performance, religious institutions, visual arts or colonial and post-colonial identities.

Return to Top

215. Greek and Roman Religion
Introduction to the religions of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds: ritual types, forms of evidence, and methods of investigation, from the Bronze Age through the early Christian era.

Return to Top

270. Special Topics in Religion
Variety of subjects pertaining to religion. Content will vary in successive offerings. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

290R. Topics Abroad
Special topics in religion taken during study abroad program and approved by Emory Department of Religion for equivalent credit. May be repeated when topic varies.

Return to Top

Upper Level Courses by Tradition

African-American
320. African-American Religion (WRT)
(Same as AAS 320) Development of religion among African Americans; trends and tendencies.

Return to Top

326. Black Christian Thought (WRT)
(Same as AAS 326) Spiritual transformations involving worship, magic and healing, ritual and aesthetic performance in Black speech and literature, music and drama; and spiritual uses of Biblical themes to empower social-political movements.

Return to Top

American
209. History of Religions in America

An examination of American religious history and culture from the Colonial period to the present.

Return to Top

319. Native American Religions
Study of several Native American religious traditions in their historical contexts, with a focus on ritual, cosmology, and social life.

Return to Top

336. Religious Pluralism in Atlanta
An exploration of local religious communities in the metropolitan area, with special emphasis on field research methodologies.

Return to Top

Asian

302. Religions in Colonial India

Historical survey of religion in India, 1756 to the present, focusing on the impact of British colonial and post-colonial settings on diverse religions in India and among Indians living abroad.

Return to Top

374. Confucian Classics (WRT)
(Same as CHN 373) Designed as an introduction to premodern Chinese culture, this course explores the literary and social practices that evolved around the canonized texts associated with Confucius and his disciples.

Return to Top

388. The Cultural Revolution (WRT)
(Same as CHN/EAS 388) This course offers a general survey of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966 - 1976), with foci on three main aspects: language, religion, and art. Students will study revolutionary media such as songs, films, and model plays, in addition to the visual and material culture of the period. Students will also stage a performance of "Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy."

Return to Top

Buddhist

305. Introduction to Buddhism (formerly titled "Early & Medieval Buddhism")
Introduction to the practices, doctrines, literature, and institutions of Buddhism, with particular focus on contemplative practices, ethics, methods of philosophical investigation, narrative traditions, and the transformation of Buddhism across cultures.

Return to Top

306. Tibetan Buddhism
Introduction to philosophical, psychological and contemplative dimensions of Tibetan Buddhism.

Return to Top

307. East Asian Buddhism
The development of Buddhism in China and Japan, including examination of monasticism, ritual, ideas of Buddhahood, Zen, Pure Land, and Buddhist relations to the state and to other religions.

Return to Top

310. Modern Buddhism
This seminar focuses on modern Buddhist history, society, and thought. Issues addressed may include colonization, women's ordination, meditation movements, conversion, eco-Buddhism, immigration, and globalization.

Return to Top

331. Culture of Buddhist Tibet
Tibet’s history, geography, and spiritual legacy produced a unique culture that only recently has come into contact with the West; these three facets will be explored for their impact on Tibetan culture.

Return to Top

365. Buddhist Philosophy
Explores the features that distinguish Buddhist thought from other traditions, as well as the unique tenets of major philosophical movements such as Shravakayana, Mahayana and Vajrayana.

Return to Top

Christian

311. Early and Medieval Christianity

Christianity from the apostolic period through the Middle Ages, with emphasis on the contribution of major theologians.

Return to Top

312. Protestant Christianity
Representative types of modern Christianity, beginning with the Reformation in Germany and concluding with contemporary issues.

Return to Top

313. Modern Catholicism (WRT)
Examination of major social, ethical, and theological issues confronting post-Vatican II Catholicism, including the intellectual and historical roots of contemporary debates.

Return to Top

348. The New Testament in its Context (WRT)
Interpretation of the New Testament in the context of the historical, social, religious, and literary environment of the eastern Mediterranean world during late antiquity.

Return to Top

350. Jesus and the Gospels (WRT)
The study of the New Testament gospels through approximately ten Christian gospels and fragments of gospels written during the first two centuries, including modern studies and debates about the historical Jesus.

Return to Top

351. Paul and His Letters (WRT)
The study of the historical role of Paul, his thinking, the major Pauline theme, as well as the problems faced by the first urban Christians.

Return to Top

Hindu

301. Hindu Traditions (WRT)

An introduction to the study of Hinduism, including an historical survey of early and medieval movements, colonial and nationalist era reinventions, and anthropological perspectives on contemporary Hindu practices.

Return to Top

303. Modern Hinduism
Hinduism in the modern period, from the early nineteenth century to the present; focusing on religious communities, rituals, modes of leadership, and the contemporary internationalization of Hinduism.

Return to Top

Islamic

315. The Qur’an (WRT)
(Same as MESAS 315.) The Qur’an in translation from historical and literary perspectives, looking at its use in Islam, its language, stylistics, modes of narrative and its relationship to Jewish, Christian and Arabian traditions.

Return to Top

316. Early and Medieval Islam

(Same as MESAS 316) A survey of the major issues in the history, religion, culture, and civilization of the Islamic world from its beginnings to the present.

Return to Top

317. Modern Islam
(Same as MESAS 317) This seminar analyzes the problem of Islam in modern history and focuses on religious responses to major events. Issues may include secularism and Post-Enlightenment modernism, reform movements, and Islamic liberalism.

Return to Top

318. Islamic Law (WRT)
(Same as MESAS 318) Introduction to Islamic law and legal theory through the examination of a variety of texts, including standard legal manuals, legal opinions, judges’ manuals, licenses, contracts, and other documents.

Return to Top

381: Islamic West 600-1600 (same as MESAS 381 & SPAN 381)
A historical and cultural survey of the Islamic West (the Maghrib) in the medieval and early modern eras, between the years 600 and 1600 CE. This region will be covered as a single cultural unit, comprising Islamic Spain (al-Andalus), North Africa, and Sicily.

Return to Top

414. Shiite Islam
(Same as MESAS 414) This course is an introduction to Shiite Islam, including a historical survey with particular attention to the Twelver and Isma’ili traditions, showing how Shiism has shaped Islamic history in general.

Return to Top

415. Great Books of the Islamic World (WRT)
(Same as MESAS 415) Investigates the role the Islamic world has played in the development of human knowledge, focusing on seminal works in historical criticism, textual criticism, legal theory, and other fields.

Return to Top

Judaic

272. Modern Jewish Literature
(Same as MESAS 222/JS 220) Readings in translation of Eastern European and Israeli authors, focusing on short fiction by Nachman of Bratslav, Mendele, Peretz, Scholem Aleichem, Agnon, Appelfeld, Amichai, and Yehoshua.

Return to Top

308. Judaism
(Same as JS 308) Explores the rituals and practices of Judaism, placing them in their historical context and examining the theological concepts that underpin them.

Return to Top

309. Jews and Judaism in Modern Times
(Same as JS 309) Modern Jewish history, society, and thought, with emphasis on religious and secular reformulations of Jewish self-identity.

Return to Top

324. The Holocaust
(Same as JS 324) An analysis of the socio-political background and the horror of the Holocaust, followed by the popular as well as the theological responses of the Jewish and Christian communities.

Return to Top

340. Rabbinic Judaism
(Same as JS 340) Background and emergence of Rabbinic Judaism in 100-500 C.E., its institutions and beliefs: study, law, chosenness, messianic doctrine of god, revelation and prayer.

Return to Top

341. Medieval Jewish Thought
(Same as JS 341) Intensive study of a major work on an important theme in medieval Jewish thought, such as Maimonides' Guide for the Perplexed, Saadia's Beliefs and Opinions, and medieval Jewish exegesis of the Bible.

Return to Top

343. Modern Jewish Thought
(Same as JS 343) Intensive study of a major work, author or movement; or of an important theme in modern Jewish thought, such as Heschel, Buber, reform, religious anthropology.

Return to Top

346. Jewish Legal Thinking
The role and methodology of law in Judaism, using difficult problems that arise due to recent advances in medical technology as a paradigm for how legal systems address hard issues.

Return to Top

Middle Eastern

251. Daily Life in Ancient Israel

(Same as MESAS 251/JS 251) Everyday life in ancient Israel (1200-586 BCE), including the economy, religion and culture, city planning, the Israelite kitchen, burials, status of women, and more.

Return to Top

260. Introduction to Biblical Archaeology
(Same as MESAS 250/JS 250) An introductory course to the field of Biblical archaeology, with a careful examination of theory, methodology, famous discoveries, important sites, and historical questions.

Return to Top

261R. Field work in Biblical Archaeology
(Same as MESAS 259R/JS 259R) Summer. Credit, 4 hours. No prerequisites.

Return to Top

327. Religion in Holy Land on Location
(Same as MESAS 327/JS 327) Summer only. This course explores Judaism, Christianity, and Islam as well as other religious groups in the Holy Land on location. In Israel. In English. No knowledge of Hebrew required.

Return to Top

361. The Sufi Way
(Same as MESAS 311) This course is an historical survey of Sufism.

Return to Top

366. Afghanistan and Central Asia
Survey of the history, cultures, and religions of Afghanistan and Central Asia including Tibet from antiquity to modern times. Topics will include the Silk Road, Buddhist, Christian, and Islamic cultures of the region, and medieval, colonial, and modern history and politics.

Upper Level Courses

300. Interpreting Religion
Critical exploration of philosophical, theological, ethical, and social science theories of religions and methods for the interpretation of religious phenomena.

Return to Top

321. Psychology of Religion
Examination of religious existence and its relation to various aspects of human life by approaches developed in major traditions of psychological study.

Return to Top

322. Religion and Sexuality (WRT)
The relation of sexuality and the sacred in symbolism, attitudes and practice; authentic human communion; and specific problems of sexual ethics.

Return to Top

323. Death and Dying
Understanding death through a study of religious attitudes and practices, modern therapies for the dying, ethical issues, and Western and Asian theological perspectives.

Return to Top

328. Women, Religion, and Ethnography (WRT)
(Same as ANT 328/WGS 328) Cross-cultural ethnographic study of women's religious lives, including ritual and leadership roles, forms and contexts of religious expression, and negotiations between dominant cultural representations and women's self-representations.

Return to Top

329. Religion and Ecology
Historical, philosophical and ethical relationships between religion and ecology; other dimensions include Eastern thought, ecofeminism, animal rights and literary nature writers.

Return to Top

332. South African History and Issues
(Same as JRNL 330, AAS 330, AFS 332, WGS 330) An introduction to the history and contemporary issues of South Africa designed to prepare students for their summer internship in Cape Town.

Return to Top

333. Religion and the Body
An exploration of the body and bodily experience in selected religious traditions. Topics may include: ritual, asceticism, monasticism, healing, gender, sex, diet, birth and death.

Return to Top

334. Dance & Embodied Knowledge
This is a theory-practice course in which we analyze the nature of embodied knowledge and the creative power of performance through twice-weekly discussions of mythologies, art, and theoretical analyses of dance and once-weekly participant performance of the Indian classical dance form of Kuchipudi.

Return to Top

369. Religion and Film
Narrative films concerned with religious issues and experience; commonalities between the film medium and the performative religious imagination.

Return to Top

387. Literature and Religion (WRT)
(Same as ENG 387) Prerequisite: one course in Religion and one course in literature, or consent of the instructors. Reading and interpretation of representative major literary works in the perspective of their religious meaning.

Return to Top

Upper Level Repeatable Courses

352R. Gender and Religion
Construction of gender, definitions of the roles and status of women and men in a variety of traditions; women’s and men’s religious lives. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

353R. Mystical Thought and Practice
Mystical texts, themes, practices, and rituals, focusing on selected mystical authors. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

354R. Ethics (WRT)
(Same as JS 354R when topic is Jewish Ethics) Analysis of methods and/or texts pertaining to ethical decision-making for individual and social problems such as race, sex/marriage, justice, war, bio-medical technology, and environmental pollution. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

355R. Ritual and Worship
History and present experience of worship or liturgy in various traditions, with a variety of methods, including the study of art, music, and/or architecture. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

356R. Theological Reflection
Issues in contemporary theology. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

357R. Religion and Conflict
This theory-practice course asks: How does conflict reveal the character and nature of a religion? How can our conflict resolution practices advance our study of religion? Includes case studies.

Return to Top

358R. Religion and Healing
Designed to explore the mind/body connection as a paradigm to understand religion and healing. Will examine the role of faith, ritual, prayer and meditation in various models of healing.

Return to Top

370R. Special Topics: Religion and Culture
Aspects of religion in relation to culture, such as theories of ritual, religion and psychoanalysis, feminist critiques of religion and culture, post-modern interpretations of religion. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

372R. Special Topics: Classical Texts and Religious Thought (WRT)
Study in depth of a problem in classical texts or religious thought. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

373R. Special Topics in Religious Studies
Study in depth of a historical or theoretical problem or tradition. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

380R. Internship in Religion
Credit 1-12 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Applied learning in a supervised work experience utilizing skills related to concentrations in religion, in such areas as community service, education and social work.

Return to Top

390R. Topics Abroad
Advanced topic(s) in religion taken during study abroad program and approved by Emory Department of Religion for equivalent credit. May be repeated when topic varies

Return to Top

472R. Topics in Religion
Credit 1-8 hours. Advanced study of an issue, problem or selection of writings. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Return to Top

495R. Directed Reading (Honors) (WRT)
Credit 1-8 hours. Independent research for senior major and joint major students selected to participate in the department's honors program.

Return to Top

497R. Directed Reading
Credit, 2-16 hours.  Maximum credit, 20 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.   Specific readings for each student are decided upon in consultation between the student and a member of the faculty.

Return to Top

Advanced Courses for Majors

470. Joint Seminar in Philosophy and Religion
(Same as Philosophy 470) Prerequisite: either Philosophy 358 or one course in Religion. The religious and philosophical consciousness in confrontation with each other; investigation of their differing natures and methods; exploration of their possible contribution to the clarification and solution of problems of mutual concern.

Return to Top

490. Senior Symposium (WRT) [note: not offered every semester]
Selected topics in Religious Studies. Required for majors.

Return to Top


About the Department | Faculty & Staff | Calendar of Events | Emory Resources | Other Resources & Affiliates | Virtual Exhibitions
Department of Religion | Emory College | Emory University Home